How ampersand (&) came from a misunderstanding

Posted @ 1:46 PM on April 21, 2019 by

The shape of the character (&) predates the word ampersand by more than 1,500 years. In the first century, Roman scribes wrote in cursive, so when they wrote the Latin word et which means “and” they linked the e and t. Over time the combined letters came to signify the word “and” in English as well. Certain versions of the ampersand, like that in the font Caslon, clearly reveal the origin of the shape. The word “ampersand” came many years later when “&” was actually part of the English alphabet. In the early 1800s, school children reciting their ABCs concluded the alphabet with the &. It would have been confusing to say “X, Y, Z, and.” Rather, the students said, “and per se and.” “Per se” means “by itself,” so the students were essentially saying, “X, Y, Z, and by itself and.” Over time, “and per se and” was slurred together into the word we use today: ampersand. When a word comes about from a mistaken pronunciation, it’s called a mondegreen. Find out why here.
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5 more ways how not to get cheated by your design clients

Posted @ 4:26 AM on April 21, 2019 by

So instead of fighting a losing battle, let’s focus on the kind of situations that can be prevented – situations that happen when good people go bad all of a sudden. Let’s try to figure out what habits we can build when working with clients so we don’t get burned on the job. Tags: design
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25 Signs That You’re a Graphic Designer

Posted @ 5:31 PM on April 19, 2019 by

You can’t go to a restaurant without secretly critiquing the menu design.
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Singular They Drives Me Up a Wall (Grammar Gripe)

Posted @ 12:41 AM on April 19, 2019 by

Singular they is the use of they (or its inflected forms, such as them or their) to refer to an entity that is not plural, or not necessarily plural. Though singular they is widespread in everyday English and has a long history of usage, debate continues about its acceptability. It occurs in two main situations: Indeterminate gender – when they refers to an individual person of unknown or unspecified sex, as in, for example, "One student failed their exam". This usage is known as epicene they. Indeterminate number – when they has no definite antecedent, or can be interpreted as referring to either a singular or plural entity. This usage is also known as generic they. For example, in "Anyone who thinks they have been affected should contact their doctor", they and their are within the scope of the universal, distributive quantifier anyone,[1] and can be interpreted as referring to an unspecified individual or to people in general (notwithstanding the fact that "anyone" is strictly grammatically singular). In some cases, they is used even when both the number and gender of the subject are known, but the identity of the person is generic, e.g. "If some guy beat me up, I'd leave them." Though semantically singular or ambiguous, singular they remains morphologically and syntactically plural (e.g. it still takes plural forms of verbs).
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Mind Your En And Em Dashes: Typographic Etiquette

Posted @ 4:02 PM on April 18, 2019 by

An understanding of typographic etiquette separates the master designers from the novices. A well-trained designer can tell within moments of viewing a design whether its creator knows how to work with typography. Typographic details aren’t just inside jokes among designers. They have been built up from thousands of years of written language, and applying them holds in place long-established principles that enable typography to communicate with efficiency and beauty. Handling these typographic details on the Web brings new challenges and restrictions that need to be considered. Below are a few rules of thumb that will have you using typography more lucidly than ever before. Tags: typographie typography webdesign design HTML dash em en
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The Fastest Way to Become a Writer with Authority, Charge High Fees, and Easily Attract DREAM Clients

Posted @ 6:06 AM on April 18, 2019 by

If you’re pursuing a paid writing career, the last thing you’d want is to be writing all the time without building a decent income. Yet I’ve seen it happen when writers fall headlong into the trap of taking every project that comes their way and doing it for low fees — much like a factory churns out product at the lowest-cost possible.Tags: Writing AmWriting
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Interesting Discussion at Quora – What does a book publisher do for an author? Which of these services carry-over to the Ebook era? #prdctn

Posted @ 10:35 PM on April 17, 2019 by

What does a book publisher do for an author? Which of these services carry-over to the Ebook era?
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When nice books are illegal | Phinney on Fonts

Posted @ 3:58 PM on April 17, 2019 by

So I was wondering, “why do publishers use the particular combo of settings they do, that is bugging me?” It turns out the answer is “because that’s the only reasonable option Adobe makes easily available to them.” Although the PDF format allows for very granular permissions settings, the Acrobat Pro and InDesign UIs do not. They give the choice of “no protection” or one of four option combinations, which determine the settings of the 10 different permissions.
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Four Reasons to Self-Publish Your Children’s Book

Posted @ 8:02 AM on April 17, 2019 by

Here are some surprising things I've learned that may give you the push to walk through the indie publishing door:Tags: Writing AmWriting selfpub fxl epub
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The Client’s Guide to Publishing Infographics

Posted @ 10:58 PM on April 16, 2019 by

When it comes to infographics, the discussion usually revolves around design and promotion. And there are some great articles and case studies written about conceptualizing and marketing a successful infographic as well as pitching them and conducting link outreach. But rarely do you read anything about the other “behind the scenes” elements that go into pulling off a successful infographic campaign. These are critical tasks and decisions that fall largely on the client to execute, not the vendor, which can come as a surprise for first time infographic clients.
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